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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Studies show that broccoli can treat cancer, respiratory diseases and more

Reposted fron NaturalNews | Tuesday, July 29, 2014 by: Michael Ravensthorpe

(NaturalNews) Along with spinach and kale, broccoli is one of the most nutritious "regular" vegetables in existence. Indeed, this cruciferous, cabbage-like vegetable, which was first grown in the Italian province of Campania, was seen as uniquely valuable among the Ancient Romans due to its significant healing properties.

When Italian immigrants introduced broccoli to the United States at the beginning of the 20th century, it became a favorite vegetable among the settlers, and its popularity continues to grow today. In fact, broccoli consumption has increased over 940 percent in the West in the last 25 years -- possibly because an ever-increasing number of studies show just how good it is for us.(1)

Contains cancer-fighting isothiocyanates

Research has shown that broccoli is effective at preventing and treating several types of cancer. For example, a review published in Recent Patents on Endocrine Metabolic & Immune Drug Discovery in 2013 concluded that cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli exhibited anti-tumor activity. The researchers also noted that the isothiocyanates in broccoli, which are known antioxidants, could "inhibit the cell viability of human cervical cancer cells, human pancreatic cancer cells, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells, human ovarian cancer cells, and have anti-inflammatory properties in the treatment of human T-cell leukemia cells."(2)

Another review published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention in 2013 also ascribed broccoli's anti-cancer benefits to its concentrations of isothiocyanates, though the researchers admitted that the chemopreventive effect of these compounds are not yet fully understood.(3)

Packed with vitamins C and K

One cup of chopped broccoli provides us with 135 percent of our recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin C and 116 percent of our RDA of vitamin K.(4) Aside from being a powerful antioxidant that helps scavenge cell-damaging free radicals from the body, vitamin C also aids the synthesis of collagen (an essential part of our connective tissue), thereby providing us with anti-aging benefits. Vitamin K, on the other hand, aids blood clot formation and helps maintain bone health. Without adequate amounts of vitamin K in our diets, we can suffer from excessive bleeding and, in the worst cases, bone diseases such as osteoporosis.

Provides protection from environmental toxins

A study published in Clinical Immunology in March 2009 found that sulforaphane -- a molecule found within isothiocyanates -- can protect us from respiratory inflammation that leads to asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and other common respiratory conditions. According to the study, the sulforaphane increased the production of antioxidant enzymes in human subjects, thereby guarding them from excessive free radical exposure associated with inhaling polluted air, vehicle fumes and cigarette smoke.(5) These results suggest that regular consumption of broccoli -- which is one of the greatest natural sources of sulforaphane -- can help protect us from environmental toxins.

Rich in fiber and additional nutrients

Broccoli is also high in many other health-boosting nutrients. Firstly, one cup of chopped broccoli supplies us with 9 percent of our RDA of dietary fiber, which helps to sweep the colon of accumulated waste, promote regularity and absorb sugar from the intestinal tract. Secondly, broccoli is packed with essential minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, selenium and potassium, which work in tandem to aid our bodies' natural processes. Thirdly, broccoli is rich in vitamin A, which helps maintain vision. It is also a fantastic weight loss food, since it contains minimal calories and fat, and possesses a virtually non-existent glycemic load.(4)

According to the Linus Pauling Institute, broccoli is best consumed raw since heat interferes with the enzyme that releases isothiocyanates, limiting the number of them that our bodies can absorb.(6)

Sources for this article include:
(1) http://www.thefresh1.com/broccoli.asp
(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23978168
(3) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23679237
(4) http://nutritiondata.self.com
(5) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2668525/
(6) http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/phytochemicals/isothio/

About the author:
Michael Ravensthorpe is an independent writer whose research interests include nutrition, alternative medicine, and bushcraft. He is the creator of the website, Spiritfoods, through which he promotes the world's healthiest foods.

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/046222_broccoli_cancer_prevention_healthy_vegetables.html#ixzz38saXEHk8



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Monday, July 21, 2014

5 Warning Signs of Magnesium Deficiency

Repost July 21. 2014 from Natural News
By Christine . S

Posted Monday, July 14, 2014 at 12:13pm EDT

Many Americans do not understand the importance of magnesium in the same way they understand calcium or iron, for instance. Nonetheless, adequate magnesium levels are crucial for brain, cardiac and muscle function and it is needed, along with silica and Vitamins D and K to promote bone health. Magnesium deficiency is more common than many people suspect, and below are 5 warning signs that could indicate a deficiency in this important mineral.

1. Ringing in the Ears or Hearing Loss
Tinnitus, or a constant, high-pitched ringing in the ears is common symtom of magnesium deficiency, as is hearing loss. There are have been a number of studies done on the relationship between ear health and sufficient magnesium levels. In one Chinese study, it was found that magnesium in sufficient quantities will prevent the formation of the free radicals that can lead to hearing loss. In a study at the Mayo Clinic, it was found that treating patients who had experienced hearing loss with magnesium supplementation often helped restore that loss within three months.

2. Muscle Cramps or Tremors
Magnesium is crucial to optimim muscle function. Without it, the body would be in a state of convulsion, because it is this mineral that allows the muscles to relax. That is why, for instance, a magnesium oxide drip is used to ease women in labor and why magnesium is found in so many sleep-inducing supplements. A lack of sufficient magnesium, therefore, can lead to facial tics, muscle cramping and twitching or cramping of the feet while trying to sleep.

3. Depression
The link between low magnesium levels and depression was understood over a century ago, when doctors would use it to treat this mental health disorder. Modern science has backed this up, with a study at a psychiatric hospital in Croatia finding that many attempted suicide patients had severely low levels of this important mineral. One advantage of magnesium over traditional antidepressants is the lack of side effects sometimes associated with these medications.

4. Abnormal Heart Function
As previously discussed, low magnesium levels can have an effect on muscles throughout the body and this includes the heart muscles. Insufficient magnesium can induce a condition known as a cardiac arrhythmia, in which the heart fails to beat regularly and this, in turn, can cause a greater risk for complications like heart attacks and strokes. That is why, for instance, doctors at the Henry Low Heart Center in Connecticut treat their arrhythmia patients with a medication which contains magnesium.

5. Kidney Stones
Many people believe that kidney stones are caused by an excess of calcium, but in fact it is a lack of magnesium that is the culprit. Magnesium prevents the formation of these stones by inhibiting the binding of calcium with oxalate, the two compounds which make up these stones. Kidney stones can be excruciatingly painful, so it is good to know that something as simple as magnesium supplementation can prevent them!

If experiencing any of these symptoms, consulting with a healthcare practitioner is a good idea. It is also wise to follow a diet which includes foods like okra, sunflower or pumpkin seeds, almonds, soy or black beans, cashews and spinach as these are all natural magnesium sources.



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Monday, July 14, 2014

10 Surprising Signs You're Sleep-Deprived



Repost from The Huffington Post | By Rachel Grumman Bender for YouBeauty.com

You may boast that you're already asleep before your head even hits the pillow, but if you're conking out that quickly, here's your wake-up call: That's a clear sign of sleep deprivation. And that's just one of the warning signs that you need to get more shut-eye.

With the help of Shelby Freedman Harris, YouBeauty Sleep Expert and director of Behavioral Sleep Medicine at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City, we've rounded up the top 10 signs that you are shortchanging yourself on sleep. If any of these sound familiar, it's time to start making sleep more of a priority. It is, after all, as essential to your well-being as food and water. And it comes with a slew of health and beauty benefits to boot, from a trimmer waistline to looking more attractive.

1. You fall asleep immediately. You might chalk this up to being a good sleeper, but the opposite is true. If you routinely fall asleep within five minutes of lying down, you probably have severe sleep deprivation, possibly even a sleep disorder, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

2. You're more impulsive than usual. Grabbed a donut at the morning meeting when you normally wouldn't touch it? Splurged on that expensive top you've been eyeing online? A lack of sleep may be to blame. "The prefrontal cortex is greatly affected by sleep deprivation," explains Harris. "This area is associated with judgment, impulse control, visual association and attention. Less sleep leads to poorer judgment and acting impulsively, e.g. poor eating when sleep deprived, buying things without thinking about the consequences, irritability and mood issues with others."

3. You're relying on clichés. If you find yourself throwing around phrases like, "Beggars can't be choosers" and "Better safe than sorry," and you're not currently in retirement, it may be time to take a nap. "The frontal lobe is associated with speech, constructive thinking and novel thinking/creativity and is greatly impacted by sleep deprivation," notes Harris. "Sleep deprived people find it difficult to have spontaneous complicated speech, leading to more slurring, use of clichéd phrases, stuttering and monotone speech."

4. You're forgetful.
If you ran out of the house to mail your dad's birthday card only to realize you -- once again -- left it on the kitchen counter, or you completely blanked on a new coworker's name despite hearing it several times, a lack of rest may be messing with your memory. Sleep leads to memory consolidation and emotional processing, according to Harris. "Without proper rest, it's harder to form memories," she notes. "It is harder to put emotional memories into context, and thus, it is more difficult to act rationally and thoughtfully."

5. You're hungrier than usual. When you don't log enough sleep each night, it's harder to stop yourself from downing a bag of chips, followed by a scoop or two of ice cream. Here's why: Sleep deprivation can increase your appetite by affecting two key hormones in our body: leptin and ghrelin. "Leptin is the hormone that tells our body to stop eating, giving us the sensation that we are full," explains Harris. "Ghrelin, on the other hand, is a hormone that gives us a hunger signal and tells us to eat. When we don't get enough sleep, the leptin/ghrelin balance is shifted, with a drop in leptin and an increase in ghrelin." In a nutshell, without a good night's sleep, the hormone telling us to eat more increases, while the hormone that tells us to stop eating decreases.

6. You’ve read this sentence twice. An inability to concentrate is a sure sign that you're not spending enough time with your eyes closed. Along with a lack of focus, not getting enough sleep also impairs your ability to make split-second decisions, according to a 2009 study in the journal Sleep -- the kind of decision-making that can come in major handy, say, when driving and trying to avoid a near accident.

7. You're clumsy. Some people seem to be naturally clumsy -- like the adorable, ever-falling Jennifer Lawrence -- but skimping on sleep can also cause issues with motor skills, such as being unsteady on your feet and stumbling when carrying your things, notes Harris.

8. You're fighting with your partner. Your partner may have ticked you off or you may just be tired -- or both. A 2013 U.C. Berkeley study found that couples have more frequent and serious fights when they don't get enough sleep. The researchers note that the lack of shut-eye makes it harder to avoid and handle conflict.

9. You're zoning out.
If you're spacing out while driving, such as missing your exit on the freeway or doing things throughout the day with little memory of them later on -- in other words, coasting on automatic pilot and not really being aware and in the moment, according to Harris -- you need to get more sleep.

10. You conk out at the movies or during a daytime flight. Falling asleep the minute you enter a dark or dull environment, particularly if it's during daylight hours, is one of the hallmarks of sleep deprivation. If you're getting enough sleep, you should be fairly peppy and alert during the day. It is daytime, after all.



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Monday, June 30, 2014

Powerhouse Fruits And Vegetables Ranked In Order Of Nutrition

 | By Anna Almendrala
Posted: Updated: 

Scientists say that certain "powerhouse" fruits and vegetables can help stave off chronic illnesses like cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. But what exactly is a powerhouse food, and are some fruits and vegetables better than others when it comes to nutrients?
Dietary researcher Jennifer Di Noia, Ph.D., of William Paterson University set out to quantify exactly how good certain fruits and vegetables are for the human body. Out of 47 different foods she tested for nutrients, 41 made the cut to be considered "powerhouse" produce.
The results were published Thursday online in Preventing Chronic Disease, a peer-reviewed journal by the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. In a Q&A with HuffPost, Di Noia explains how she ranked each fruit and vegetable, and which ones didn't make the cut. The powerhouse list follows after the interview.
HP: How did you develop this classification system for fruits and vegetables?
JD: Powerhouse fruits and vegetables (PFV) are described in the literature as green leafy, yellow/orange, citrus and cruciferous items -- but a clear definition was lacking. So I decided to look at densities of key nutrients in foods belonging to the aforementioned groups. I thought it would be easier for consumers to have a PFV list as there is often confusion about which foods belong in which groups.
HP: How would you describe the points system?
JD: It is a nutrients-to-calories ratio that expresses the mean of percent daily values for the qualifying nutrients the food provides per 100 calories. So higher-ranking foods provide more nutrients-per-calories.
HP: What are some of the important nutrients you were looking for?
JD: Nutrients of public health importance as per the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and Institute of Medicine, i.e., potassium, fiber, protein, calcium, iron, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folate, zinc and vitamins A, B6, B12, C, D, E and K.
HP: Why did some foods (raspberry, tangerine, cranberry, garlic, onion, and blueberry) not make the cut? People especially think blueberries are superfoods. 

JD: Absolutely. They were not included because they were not rich sources of the qualifying nutrients. Their health benefits are likely due in part to the presence of phytochemicals. Had I been able to incorporate phytochemical data in the calculation of nutrient density scores, they may have made the cut.

HP: How should people use this point system? How do you advise people change their diets using this ranking?

JD: The PFV list will help consumers know what PFV are and help them choose them as part of their overall fruit and vegetable intake. The scores may help focus consumers on their daily energy needs/how best to get the most nutrients from their foods.
POWERHOUSE FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
Food: Nutrient Density Score
Watercress: 100.00
watercress
Chinese cabbage 91.99
Chard: 89.27
Beet green: 87.08
Spinach: 86.43
Chicory: 73.36
chicory
Leaf lettuce: 70.73
Parsley: 65.59
Romaine lettuce: 63.48
Collard green: 62.49
Turnip green: 62.12
turnip green
Mustard green: 61.39
Endive: 60.44
Chive: 54.80
Kale: 49.07
Dandelion green: 46.34
dandelion green
Red pepper: 41.26
Arugula: 37.65
Broccoli: 34.89
Pumpkin: 33.82
Brussels sprout: 32.23
brussel sprouts
Scallion: 27.35
Kohlrabi: 25.92
Cauliflower: 25.13
Cabbage: 24.51
Carrot: 22.60
carrots
Tomato: 20.37
Lemon: 18.72
Iceberg lettuce: 18.28
Strawberry: 17.59
Radish: 16.91
radish
Winter squash (all varieties): 13.89
Orange: 12.91
Lime: 12.23
Grapefruit (pink and red): 11.64
Rutabaga: 11.58
rutabaga
Turnip: 11.43
Blackberry: 11.39
Leek: 10.69
Sweet potato: 10.51
Grapefruit (white): 10.47
white grapefruit




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Saturday, June 28, 2014

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Friday, June 27, 2014

8 Underrated Vegetables With Extraordinary Health Benefits

Reposted from Grandparents.com
Via The Huffington Post | By Deborah Long | Posted: Updated: 
Your grandmother probably told you the same thing you tell your own grandchildren: Eat your vegetables; they’re good for you. And there are always certain veggies we focus on—leafy greens like spinach, broccoli, and the like. But scientific research shows that some veggies that we all write off (celery and mushrooms, anyone?) are actually nutritional all-stars, too. Read on to learn about the nutritional power—from helping reduce the risk of cancer to boosting your immune system—of these seemingly ordinary vegetables.
One word of caution: the chemical compounds in these natural gems are so potent they can interfere with some prescription drugs, so if you’re taking medication, check with your doctor or pharmacist before you add them.

  • 1
    Celery
    If you associate celery with diets, or think the stalks are nothing more than sturdy swizzle sticks for your Bloody Mary, think again. Evidence suggests there’s a world of health benefits in every crunch. Dieters count on celery because it’s low in calories—only 10 calories in a large stalk—but it also delivers phthalides, which are thought to act as a natural diuretic. Those same phtalides support the circulatory system, and can help to reduce high blood pressure.

    But the best reason to add celery to the grocery list: it just might rev up your sex life. According to Alan Hirsch, M.D., Director of the Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation, celery contains pheromones, airborne sex chemicals, that are released when you chew on a stalk of the green stuff. It’s rumored that Casanova ate celery every day to keep his libido strong and if it worked for Casanova, we say pass the crudite.
  • 2
    Mushrooms
    One of nature’s most powerful tools for fighting breast cancer may already be sitting in your refrigerator. Mushrooms—from humble, button mushrooms to more exotic shitakes—have been shown to improve the body’s immune system and reduce risk of colon, stomach, and prostate cancer. In one study, eating mushrooms cut the risk of Chinese women getting breast cancer by 64%.

    Mushrooms also contain vitamin D and long-chain polysaccharides that can help boost your immune system to help you fight the common cold. To access all the nutritional goodness of mushrooms, be sure to cook them, rather than eat them raw.
  • 3
    Brussels Sprouts
    The Brussels sprout may be small, but don’t be deceived. Whether or not you’re a fan, the Brussels sprout is a cancer-fighting Jedi. Brussels sprouts contain more anti-carcinogenic compounds called glucosinolates, than any other cruciferous vegetable. One of these compounds, called sinigrin, causes cancer cells to self-destruct.

    More good news? Using a Brussels sprout extract, researchers at the National Institute for Health showed that the glucosinolates also are able to stabilize DNA in white blood cells by blocking offending enzymes.
  • 4
    Carrots
    You know that carrots are good for your eyesight. The beta-carotene that makes them orange is converted to vitamin A by your body and that can help protect you from macular degeneration, as well as glaucoma. Eating carrots can even help to improve night vision, which is important when driving after dark.

    What most of us don't know is that carrots are almost as good for our outsides as they are for our insides. According to research, carrots contain a powerful antiseptic compound that kills germs and can prevent infection and help wounds to heal more quickly. Shred them raw, cook them and mash them, or soak a cloth in carrot juice and apply it to the affected area. An NIH study found that peeled, shredded carrots inhibit food spoilage bacteria, which supports the theory that carrots have beneficial antiseptic powers.
  • 5
    Onions
    If you slice an onion, and it makes you cry, rejoice! Those compounds that are bringing tears to your eyes are called thiosulfinates and they could keep you from having a stroke, according to some studies. Thiosulfinates act as a natural blood thinner and can keep blood platelets from clumping. In addition, the quercitin in onions has been shown to relax and dilate blood vessels, which also aids in stroke prevention.

    Onions are high in vitamin C, provide calcium, iron, folic acid, and dietary fiber. And, because they can kill the H pylori bacteria, they may also help to prevent—but not treat—stomach ulcers.
  • 6
    Bell peppers
    Crunchy, sweet, and delicious, bell peppers are also one of the most healthful foods you can eat. One red bell pepper will provide almost twice your daily allowance for vitamin C. Bell peppers also are an excellent source of vitamin B6, which is used by your body to help regulate metabolism and to enable the cells in your brain to communicate with one another.

    Bell peppers also contain minerals, including potassium, zinc, and manganese. According to The Linus Pauling Institute, their high levels of manganese may help to prevent osteoporosis.
  • 7
    Garlic
    Garlic has been credited with warding off everything from vampires to the plague. One whiff, and you know it’s powerful. It’s antibacterial and antiviral and fresh garlic may help to prevent some cases of food poisoning by killing E coli and salmonella bacteria. It’s been credited in studies with lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, protecting the heart, boosting the immune system, and regulating blood sugar levels.

    But what really pushed garlic onto our list is that according to research garlic may help protect against breast, colon and other cancers. And according to research done at the Mayo Clinic, garlic can kill the rogue cells that cause prostate cancer. Maybe that’s part of the reason the Mayo Clinic suggests that men with enlarged prostate—which includes 50% of men over the age of 60—use garlic to season their food.
  • 8
    Kale
    What provides a daily dose of vitamin A, more vitamin C than an orange, and supports bone health with vitamin K and more calcium than an 8-ounce glass of milk? Kale. Yes, we all know kale is good for us, but here’s what you might not know about this nutritional powerhouse and why it made our list: It’s a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids, which means a diet that includes kale will give your brain a boost, helping to fight depression. Those same fatty acids, along with kale’s quercetin supply, will fight inflammation and can help to prevent or alleviate arthritis.

    If all that good stuff isn’t enough to convince you, how about a longer life? Dr. Drew Ramsey, author of "50 Shades of Kale" says that the kaemferol in kale literally can turn on the genes that promote longer life.


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    2013-02-21-grandparentslogo.jpg

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